Copy and paste the following code to your R Studio platform or R version:

# Functions in R – a sequence of statements grouped together for a purpose
# We do not need to re-write the code, just to call the function each time
# we need. So, we save time and code lines by using functions the right way

vec1 <- c(1:10)
print(vec1) # an example of in-built function
head(vec1, 5) # another example

# In constrast, we have the user-defined functions

print.func <- function() {

print(“My first function”)

}

print.func()

add.function <- function(a, b) {

a + b

}

add.function(3, 5)
add.function(10, 20)
add.function(30, -30)

operations.function <- function(x, a, b) {

switch(x, a + b, a – b, a * b, a / b)

}

# the x parameter of the function determines which operation is going
# to be operated – for instance, 1 for addition, 3 for multiplication
operations.function(1, 2, 3)
operations.function(4, 9, 3)

# default function arguments

operations.function <- function(x, a, b = 10) {

switch(x, a + b, a – b, a * b, a / b)

}

operations.function(3, 3)

# Alternative loops in R

x <- rnorm(100000, mean = 0, sd = 1)
head(x)
length(x)

y <- rnorm(100000, mean = 10, sd = 2)
head(y)
length(y)

combined.df <- data.frame(x,y)
head(combined.df)
str(combined.df)
mean(combined.df$x)
mean(combined.df$y)

combined.copy <- combined.df

# let us log the time of the process to understand how long it takes

start <- proc.time()

for(i in 1:100000) {
for(j in 1:2) {

combined.copy[i,j] <- combined.copy[i,j] + 1

}
}

end <- proc.time() – start
print(end)
# It took almost 2 minutes in my machine
# Let’s check the outcome
head(combined.copy)
head(combined.df)

# If we exploit the vectorized nature of R, the same process takes
# merely a second – the difference is indeed stunning

combined.copy.R <- combined.df + 1
head(combined.copy.R)
head(combined.df)

# ifelse construct

new.df <- combined.df

new.df$flag <- ifelse(combined.df$x < 1, “0”, “1”)
# again, this vectorized operation was really fast

head(new.df)

# The apply function family in R
# Write complex code in a simple statement

help(“apply”)

x <- rnorm(100000, mean = 0, sd = 1)
head(x)
length(x)

y <- rnorm(100000, mean = 10, sd = 2)
head(y)
length(y)

combined.df <- data.frame(x,y)
head(combined.df)
str(combined.df)
mean(combined.df$x)
mean(combined.df$y)

combined.copy <- combined.df

mean <- apply(combined.copy, 2, mean)
# 1 for rows and 2 for columns

print(mean)
print(mean(combined.copy$x))

z <- c(2,3)

output.apply <- t(apply(combined.copy, 1, function(combined.copy, z){combined.copy + z}, z))
# the reason for transposing the data frame is because the output if we not transpose it
# is not what we want to achieve, since we want to add the number 2 to the x column and
# the number 3 to the y column and store it as a data frame with 2 columns, meaning that we
# keep the same number of columns and this is the case only when we use the t function

head(output.apply)
head(combined.df)

Posted by Dimitris

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s